She Get it From her Mama

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The wise words of Juvenile...

 "Oh, where she get her eyes from? She get it from her mamma... Oh, where she get her thighs from? She get it from her mamma... Where she learn how to cook from? She get it from her mamma... Oh, where she get them looks from? She get it from her mamma... But where she get that ass from? She get it from her mamma... But where she get her class from? She get it from her mamma... Oh, where she get that chest from? She get it from her mamma... Where she learn how to dress from? She get it from her mamma... Where does she get her sense from? She get it from her mamma... Where does she get her income? She get it from her mamma... Look, where she get that walk from? She get it from her mamma..."

I never dreamed that I would one day open a blog post with Juvenile lyrics.  But bam.  I did it.  No going back now.  I thought maybe I should only include one line... but I just kept on typing.  Its too ridiculous not to include more.

The mother daughter relationship is a special thing.  Often quite firey.  Not always perfect.  Sometimes non-existant...  But it can also be full of love, respect, and a source of real friendship.  Below is a collection of photographs of some of my favorite women and their mothers or daughters.  

 

For my art project this week, I dug up a dance piece from the archives.  In college, I did my senior choreographic thesis on the cyclical nature of the mother daughter relationship; how a daughter's relationship with her mother, in turn effects how she (if she) becomes a mother in the future.  

I got to work with an incredible cast of dancers from the dance department at GWU for this piece - 5 years later, I'm still in awe of what they did with the movement I gave them.  Its a little strange going back to a piece of art I made what feels like a million years ago... its kind of like opening a time machine.  There are things I'd do differently now, pieces of the choreography that I don't have any recollection of coming up with, and bits and pieces of the whole thing that I roll my eyes at... but bigger and louder than all of that are my memories of how much fun I had putting all of this together.   So hop into my time machine and head back to the Marvin Theater on the evening of March 1, 2008. 

As I did back in 2008, I dedicate this piece of art to my mom, Margo Ayres Smith ~ I love you, mom!